Midnight in the Garden of Goop and Evil

gwyneth paltrow goop
Gwyneth Paltrow’s self-care and treatments have always been part of her personal brand, so it makes sense to bring in higher-tier facialists and other practitioners not readily accessible to plebes. Photo: Neilson Barnard/Getty Images for goop
Rachel Strugatz
July 10, 2024

The latest addition to the Goop offline universe opened last week in Larkspur, at the Marin Country Mart, an upscale-y outdoor mall that also includes The RealReal, Todd Snyder, Diptyque, Le Marais Bakery, etcetera. For the first time, the new location will have a treatment room where customers can get “experiential facials” and presumably other yet-to-be-announced services. The treatment room, which will be open for booking in the next few months, will be “primarily centered” on new Goop Beauty products, said a Goop spokesperson.

Offering beauty services is obviously a smart play for Goop, whose retail footprint now includes six stores. Gwyneth Paltrow’s self-care and treatments have always been part of her personal brand, so it makes sense to bring in higher-tier facialists and other practitioners not readily accessible to plebes. (Perhaps the Marin location could one day even offer the same treatments Paltrow herself gets.) Goop could probably charge whatever premium it wants for a Paltrow-approved facial or lymphatic massage, which is also a decent excuse to promote Goop Beauty’s skin and body care along the way. Of course, a few expensive facials won’t move the needle for Goop,  revenue-wise. Mostly, this new “concept” is just another marketing vehicle for Paltrow’s lifestyle brand, and Goop already has brand awareness in spades. What it needs is a proper C.E.O.