And Now the TV Purge Begins…

Less than a week after the WGA strike ended, hundreds of reinstated writers have been notified that their deals will not be extended.
Less than a week after the WGA strike ended, hundreds of reinstated writers have been notified that their deals will not be extended. Photo: Gina Ferazzi/Getty Images
Matthew Belloni
October 1, 2023

I know a lot of writers and reps who quietly breathed a sigh of relief when the studios opted to suspend, rather than terminate, their overall deals during the WGA strike. Months of zero pay would hurt, of course, but once the strike settled and the pain was over, the time off—and the studio checks—would just be added on to the end of their deals.   

So, yeah, welcome to post-strike Hollywood. For most TV writers under contract, the studios have flushed those assumptions down the toilet. Less than a week after the WGA strike ended, hundreds of reinstated writers have been notified that their deals will not be extended. And when many of those deals expire, they will not be renewed. It’s bad. Texting with agents and lawyers this weekend, the estimates are anywhere between 60 percent to 80 percent of suspended writer deals have been impacted. One major employer, Universal Studio Group, extended none of its suspended writers.